Materials that go together

When one chooses a cravat to wear that day, one also has to pay attention to the material. There are certain rules that should be followed to make the choice easier. For example, because it is not possible to be hot and cold at the same time, there is no reason why one should wear a woollen cravat with a flax suit and vice versa. One should pay attention to the texture and weave harmony. Try not to wear a satin or silk cravat with a rough wool or cotton suit. A good rule is that a cravat should determine the weave of the suit or the shirt. A rep cravat goes well with a twill suit because they are finely woven. A woollen cravat goes with a tweed jacket. Finally, cravat material should be appropriate to the occasion. A rich silk weave is more suitable for an evening attire than for a day in an office.

Matching a cravat and a suit or a shirt can be tricky. The first rule is that elements should not be too similar or too different so as not to exclude one another. Combining stripes with stripes can be successful as long as there is a difference in the stripes’ width. Motifs can clash when it comes to shape or size. Matching thick asymmetric stripes can present a problem, but there is no rule on matching polka-dot and striped pattern, as long as their size goes well together. The safest way is to test whether the cravat’s dots fit between the shirt’s stripes. The more similar the size of motifs is between a shirt, a cravat and a jacket, the better the impression.

Motifs can also clash because of their theme. For example, a cravat with a hunting motif clashes with a classic striped suit; a classic modern polka-dot silk cravat looks ridiculous with a tweed suit.

From A small cravat book by Francoise Chaille. Flammarion (1999)

Materials that go together2017-02-24T13:43:07+02:00

Cravat psychology

Psychology and clinic psychology have studied the cravat as a unique fashion phenomenon. Here are some interesting insights.

If a person wears only one cravat type:

  • striped patterns reveal a powerful will and power aspirations
  • conservative people wear green cravats
  • people who want to please everybody wear polka-dot patterns
  • eccentric people wear flashy cravats
  • introverted people usually wear black cravats.

Cravat psychology2017-02-24T13:42:28+02:00

Advice from the past

Here is some advice from Count Della Galda’s book (1827) “The art of knotting cravats in usual and unusual ways in sixteen lessons”. Here are some guidelines on which cravats to take on a journey. A man should never travel without a small suitcase in which he will put his cravat collection.


The suitcase should contain:

  • 1. a dozen of plain white cravats.
  • 2. a dozen of white cravats with a chequered, polka-dot or striped pattern.
  • 3. a dozen of coloured cravats.
  • 4. at least three dozens of shirt collars.
  • 5. two fake collars.
  • 6. two black silk cravats.
  • 7. a small iron.

Advice from the past2017-02-24T13:46:35+02:00

Style, strictness and imagination in wardrobe of an elegant man

Wardrobe is a French word: garde (to keep, preserve) and robe (clothing, wardrobe). It keeps not only our clothing garments, but our secrets, mysteries, and continuous games as well.Good wardrobe, i.e. a number of clothing garments and fashion details which can be combined together, is created at the same moment when a desired vision of one´s appearance and style is precisely depicted. From that moment on, the image has to be directed in a way that each and every new acquisition contains a precise connection with the complete style, as we would say for a piece of art in a collection, that it has only one function – function that will do more than indulging a whim. A desired clothing garment has to be put into the context with the rest of the garments that have you already obtained.


Good wardrobe, as good library, is finally starting to get a shape well formed, and only after a number of years it may be considered defined. Only at this point, in carefully chosen wardrobe cabinets, the clothing garments are starting to get older and better. Time is the only judge who can evaluate clothes, outside a certain moment´s pointless trends. So, fabric has to be made of natural materials: wool, flax, silk or cotton. To wrap it up – let´s remind ourselves that a philosophical a collector´s point of view can be put into use very successfully, even on those who do not own more than three suits and twenty cravats. It isn´t necessary to be a multimillionaire to know how to dress well, however, taking care of your wardrobe is of great importance, for the clothes make a necessary item that travels with us along the way, all along the journey of life.

 

 

Style, strictness and imagination in wardrobe of an elegant man2017-02-24T13:49:37+02:00

How to match a cravat and a suit

A cravat is an important accessory and it should match our attire in material, pattern and colour. If one does not have many cravats, it is sufficient to have two plain cravats which can be worn on several occasions. When a plain cravat is worn with a patterned shirt or suit, one should make sure that the colours match.


For example, a yellow, green or brown cravat does not match a blue or grey suit, but you can wear a green or brown cravat with a brown suit. A patterned cravat can be worn with a plain suit and shirt if it matches with the colour and the pattern of the suit. Too colourful cravats should not be worn with an elegant suit.

It is important to know that the cravat should not be the same colour as the shirt or the suit. A smart dresser will know how to refresh their apparel by simply changing the cravat; a grey suit with a plain shirt will look completely different with a red cravat one put on in the morning and a blue one in the afternoon.

Here are some tables that can help you choose different colour combinations
Suit or jacket Green cravat Brown cravat Grey cravat Black cravat White cravat Red cravat Blue cravat Yellow cravat Purple cravat Wine-red cravat
Dark blue YES NO YES NO NO YES YES NO YES YES
Dark green YES NO YES NO NO NO YES YES NO NO
Brown YES YES NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO
Grey YES YES NO NO NO YES YES NO YES YES
Black NO NO YES YES NO YES YES NO YES YES
White-beige YES YES NO NO NO YES YES NO YES YES

How to match a cravat and a suit2017-02-24T13:51:43+02:00

18th October – The Cravat day!

The purpose of Cravat Day

The installation “A Cravat around the Arena”, performed on 18th October 2003 in Pula, created by Marijan Bušić, was as a world scale spectacle, seen on world television by more than a billion people. It was assessed as “the most ambitious, most well-thought out concept and project to promote the Croatian identity” (Ive Šimat Banov). Through this installation, with the largest cravat in the world, the ancient and the contemporary eras were linked symbolically, and the red color of the cravat sent a message to the world of love and life together for all peoples and nations. At this year’s book fair in Leipzig, where Croatia was a partner country, on the title page of the program book of Croatian authors there was a picture of precisely the Cravat around the Arena.


“The cravat is communication, a universal symbol of dignity and dress culture, and its symbolic potential also holds other values. The vertical cravat symbolizes the human vertical – human dignity and self-awareness, a moment of ceremony and celebration, success and the business spirit… By its fluttering lightness, however, on the one hand, and the knot on the other, the cravat “binds together” freedom and responsibility. It encourages us to communicate more aware of our own dignity and the dignity of others, our freedom, but also our responsibility. Due to its huge symbolic power, the cravat has epochal importance for Croatia and the world” Marijan Bušić pointed out, as the initiator of the project, Croatia – the Homeland of the Cravat.

With the cravat and the AC projects, Croatia is not only presenting itself to the world but is communicating with it, thereby showing its desire for openness and an exchange of cultural values with other nations. This desire for openness to other cultures, despite its suffering in history, has always been a dominant characteristic of Croatia’s relationship with the world. After the worldwide success of the Cravat around the Arena installation, which pointed out the cravat as a special medium on a world scale, AC launched the initiative to mark 18th October every year as Cravat Day in Croatia and the world.

Last year’s Cravat Day was promoted on 18th October as a “day of ceremony and community” under the auspices of the President of the Republic of Croatia, Stjepan Mesić, and was marked by a series of cultural and social events throughout Croatia – in Zagreb, Pula, Rijeka, Zadar, Split, Knin, Imotski, Dubrovnik, Ogulin, Varaždin, Karlovac, Osijek, Nova Gradiška, Slavonski Brod… Some of these events were prompted by AC, and many events were initiated by towns, tourist boards, various cultural associations, and individuals at their own initiative. Cravat Day was “celebrated” in various towns throughout the world, in Dublin, Tuebingen, Como, Tokyo, Sidney… Last year, the celebration of Cravat Day confirmed that people in Croatia and the world understand and accept the message and value of Cravat Day. We believe that marking Cravat Day contributed to establishing and awareness of the positive values of identity in Croatian society, and a recognizable and positive image of Croatia in the world. At the same time, the cravat, with its powerful symbolism, may be a factor in strengthening European identity and unity. Therefore we propose that the 18th October be marked every year in the Republic of Croatia as Cravat Day, and that the same proposal should be sent to the European Union and the UN.

18th October – The Cravat day!2017-02-24T14:05:29+02:00

Cravat day – 18th October 2007

Academia Cravatica was founded in 1997 with the mission of promoting the tie or cravat as part of the Croatian, European, and world cultural heritage, and as a special medium of communication. The cravat is the only Croatian symbol which is universally known and appreciated, and at the same time is recognized and acknowledged as a Croatian symbol. The Croatian origins of the tie or cravat, founded on historic, ethnological and linguistic facts, are confirmed by world encyclopedias and other scientific sources. In addition, the many projects run by Academia Cravatica over the past ten years, have promoted Croatia – the homeland of the cravat, on a world scale. For example, the installation “The Cravat around the Arena” in Pula on 18th October 2003 was staged as a major world performance, which was seen on television throughout the world by more than a billion people. It is considered that this was the most ambitious promotion of the Croatian identity in the world to date. This installation, with the largest cravat in the world, symbolically brought together the ancient and modern ages, and the red color of the cravat sent a message to the world of love and life together of peoples and nations.


Croats gave the world the cravat, but it was nurtured, developed and perfected by other nations. For example, the Americans conceived a cravat in three parts and thereby perfected it technically. But the most important contribution to the development of the cravat came from the French, the English and other European nations. Therefore the cravat is a symbol of Europe. This is seen in the now common custom of the European Union that each country presiding over Union presents its own specific cravat at the beginning of its term.

The cravat is a universal symbol of elegance and the culture of dressing, but its powerful symbolic potential contains many other values. The vertical cravat symbolizes the human vertical – human dignity and self-awareness, moments of solemnity and ceremony, success and a business spirit… With its lightness on the one hand and the knot on the other, the cravat “binds” together freedom and responsibility. It encourages us to be more aware in our communication of our dignity and the dignity of others – our freedom, but also our responsibility. Due to its enormous symbolic power, the cravat is of great significance for Croatia and the world.

Marking Cravat Day, will contribute to the establishment and illumination of all the positive values of identity in Croatian society, and a recognizable and positive image of Croatia in the world. The initiative for marking Cravat Day has been supported by the Prime Minister dr. Ivo Sanader, and the program to mark the day will take place under the patronage of the President of the Republic of Croatia, Mr. Stjepan Mesić. The proposal to mark the national Cravat Day has also been supported by the Committee for Education, Science and Culture of the Croatian Parliament. Cravat Day will be marked by social and cultural events in several towns in Croatia, and, with the support of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and European Integration of the RoC, in some other cities around the world.

We invite social and cultural institutions and Croatian citizens, in this country and abroad, to mark Cravat Day in their own communities in a worthy manner, as a day of celebration and community.

Marijan Bušić, prof.

 

Cravat day – 18th October 20072017-02-24T14:07:18+02:00

Children and cravats

Marijan Bušić‘s project ‘Cravat in education and upbringing of children and teenagers’ is elaborated in a letter sent to Croatian president Franjo Tuđman in 1995. The project is a part of a larger project: Croatia-homeland of the cravat which was started in 1990 by Marijan Bušić. Non-profit institution Academia Cravatica (AC) has realized several projects which promote the cravat in education and upbringing of children and teenagers (picture-book The story of the cravat (2001); exhibition of children cravat drawings in Anglo-American playroom in Zagreb (2001); Veli Jože’s cravat picture-book (2003) and Balun video-clip (2003).)


‘Cravat in education and upbringing of children and teenagers’ project will include preschool children, elementary school students, high-school students and students. It will analyze the cravat as a specific communication medium and a recognizable symbol of Croatia around the world. Within the project, a scientific (psychological-pedagogical) valorisation of the role and the results of cravat-related education in children and teenagers is anticipated. Kindergarten “Šumska jagoda” incorporated the Cravat and preschool children project into their project called “Children- keepers of ancestral heritage”. The project is based on the basic human rights to the full development of human personality and to freedom of thought, conscience and religion.

A child also has the right to a regional and national identity. The cravat has an important role in that process because it is a universal symbol of success and festivity, dignity and civility. At the same time it represents an epochal Croatian contribution and is a widely known Croatian image symbol. The identity upbringing process, which emphasizes creativity, children’s ideas and interests, also encompasses educating children about understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations regardless of their cultural identities.

Children and cravats2017-02-24T14:09:56+02:00

Cravat day 2010 in Croatia and the World

The Croatian origin of the cravat

During the Thirty Years War in the 17th century (1618-1648) Croatian soldiers were known everywhere as exceptional warriors, and they joined the French royal army. Alongside their military skills they were noted for one detail. They wore a kerchief tied around their necks. That kerchief, tied in a knot, quickly spread as a fashion accessory and took on an ethnic name, so the name of the nation – Cravate (Croates, Hrvati) – became the name of that item – the cravat.

The Croatian origins of the tie/cravat, founded on historical, ethnological and linguistic facts, are confirmed by domestic and world scholarly sources. For example, the French monograph Le Grande histoire de la cravate (author Francois Chaille, Flammarion Press, Paris, 1994) explains and specifically confirms the Croatian origins of the cravat. The Encyclopedia Britannica, under the noun “cravat” states that it derives from Crabate, Cravate, Croatian and that the appearance of the cravat dates from 1656. The Italian monograph Miss Cravatta, published in 1996 in Como, the best-known European and world centre for the production of cravats, undisputedly links the origin of the cravat undisputedly with the arrival of the Croatian cavalry at the time of Louis XIV etc. Questions (and the correct answer given) about the Croatian origin of the cravat are being asked increasingly on television quizzes in Japan, Turkey, Germany, Italy and other countries. The colorful kerchief of our soldiers in the Thirty Years War was taken from Croatian folk costumes. In Croatian traditional culture, there are as many as about forty men’s and twenty women’s folk costumes, both in Croatia and in other regions where Croats live – with a knotted kerchief as an essential part. The cravat is an “exceptional example of Croatian design of planetary value” (Boris Ljubičić) the only Croatian symbol that is universally known and appreciated, and at the same time recognizably Croatian. Croats gave the world the cravat and other nations have gone on perfecting it and made it into a universal symbol of dignity and male dress culture, a fashion accessory, which is increasingly interesting to women. The Americans conceived the cravat in three parts and so brought it to technical perfection. The most significant contributions to the perfection of the cravat came from the French, the English and other European nations. Therefore the cravat is a symbol of Europe. This may be seen in the already common practice of the European Union, where each presiding country, at the beginning of its term, presents itself with a specific cravat. “The example of the cravat shows that we have something to show to the world. Croatia has something to offer, it has evidence that we have made a contribution to world culture,” (Tomislav Šola).

The project – Croatia, the Homeland of the Cravat

At the end of the 20th century the cravat “returned” to its Croatian origins. Up to 1990 the extraordinary fact of the Croatian origins of the cravat was for the most part not an integral part of Croatia’s self-awareness, and the Croatian origins of the cravat were only known by a few scholars in the world. Today the cravat is “certainly the most recognizable Croatian souvenir and a kind of symbol… It is appropriate for the promotion of Croatia since it is already generally accepted in the world and it is at the same time both Croatia’s and the world’s. It is also an inexhaustible source of stories and inspiration. So through the story about Croats and the cravat the story of Croatia is also indirectly spread in the world’s media” (Božo Škoko). This major step forward began in the nineteen-nineties when the project, “Croatia, the Homeland of the Cravat” was launched, with visionary conviction that Croatia can present itself most worthily to the world precisely as the “Homeland of the Cravat”. As part of that project the Croata brand of cravat was launched along with the not-for-profit institution Academia Cravatica (AC), with the mission to promote the cravat as a special medium and part of the Croatian, European and world cultural heritage. Without the projects by AC the fact of the Croatian origins of the cravat would probably remain just another one of our unused historical opportunities. In 1990, the Croata brand was founded in Zagreb, with the visionary conviction of Marijan Bušić and Zlatko Penavić that Croatia could be presented more worthily to the world precisely as the “Homeland of the Cravat”. The new Croatian product – Croata cravats, became a Croatian souvenir recognized throughout the world, containing three marks of the Croatian national identity: the Croatian origins of the cravat, the national name Croata and motifs from the Croatian identity using the cravat as a medium. The cravat’s powerful potential as a means of communicating identity was recognized from the very outset, and since then Croata cravats have been used intensively in the tourist and diplomatic promotion of Croatia. The Croata brand places Croatia in the select company of the few countries who have their own original, and at the same time globally recognizable brand. This brand symbolically expresses the harmony between Croatian self-awareness and identity, on the one hand, and its openness to its European identity and global cultural values on the other. The cravat is not only a universal fashion detail, but at the same time, due to its symbolic power and aesthetic value, also a constant source of artistic inspiration. On that basis the strong promotion of Croatia as the Homeland of the Cravat is being developed through projects by the institution Academia Cravatica, which through the media is becoming well-known to the world public. The not-for-profit institution Academia Cravatica was founded eleven years ago (1997) with the mission of promoting the cravat as a special medium and part of the Croatian, European and world heritage. Amongst the many projects already run by AC, in terms of the exceptional response of the world public, the installation “A Cravat around the Arena”, created by Marijan Bušić, and the international exhibition “The Challenge of the Cravat” are outstanding. This exhibition, with a collection of about one hundred works by artists from fifteen countries (members of the jury: the academic Tonko Maroević, Ive Šimat Banov and Enes Quien), has been seen since 2004 in about ten countries around the world. In each country the exhibition visits, it includes works by local artists on the subject of the cravat, and so the exhibition’s collection is constantly growing.

The Message of Cravat Day

The installation “A Cravat around the Arena”, created by Marijan Bušić and staged on 18th October 2003 in Pula, was as a world scale spectacle, seen on world television by more than a billion people. It was assessed as “the most ambitious, most well-thought out concept and project to promote the Croatian identity” (Ive Šimat Banov). Through this installation, with the largest cravat in the world, the ancient and the contemporary eras were linked symbolically, and the red color of the cravat sent a message to the world of love and life together for all peoples and nations. “The cravat is communication”, says Marijan Bušić, interpreting the cravat not only as a symbol of Croatia, but also a symbol of Europe and a sign of the values of civilization of freedom and responsibility.With the Croata cravats and the AC projects, Croatia is not only presenting itself to the world but is communicating with it, thereby showing its desire for openness and an exchange of cultural values with other nations. This desire for openness to other cultures, despite its suffering in history, has always been a dominant characteristic of Croatia’s relationship with the world. The cravat is a universal symbol of dignity and dress culture, and its symbolic potential also holds other values. The vertical cravat symbolizes the human vertical – human dignity and self-awareness, a moment of ceremony and celebration, success and the business spirit… By its fluttering lightness, however, on the one hand, and the knot on the other, the cravat “binds together” freedom and responsibility. It encourages us to communicate more aware of our own dignity and the dignity of others, our freedom, but also our responsibility. Due to its huge symbolic power, the cravat has epochal importance for Croatia and the world After the worldwide success of the Cravat around the Arena installation, which pointed out the cravat as a special medium on a world scale, in 2008 AC launched the initiative to mark 18th October every year as Cravat Day in Croatia and the world. Since it originated from the Croats, the Croatian Parliament showed the cravat special honor, and in 2008 proclaimed 18th October Cravat Day in the Republic of Croatia The cravat as a sign of dignity and self-awareness has been worn for centuries by people around the planet. Cravat Day has been marked every year in Croatia since 2008, and is being increasingly accepted in other countries all around the world. Let us mark Cravat Day this year too, in 2010! Let us wear cravats with pride and joining with others, remind ourselves of the values it communicates: human dignity, the culture of civilization, the harmony of freedom and responsibility, important moments of celebration and solemnity, business success, a spirit of community between people and nations… With the cravat we send a message of true, lasting values, as a good foundation for the future. A red cravat has been made specially to mark Cravat Day, from cloth used to make the “Cravat Around the Arena” – the art installation by Marijan Bušić from 18th October 2003.

Cravat day 2010 in Croatia and the World2017-02-24T14:51:07+02:00